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Joint Core Strategy Issues and Key Questions

5. Strategic Spatial Policy Areas

Development in the JCS Area

 

Informing the Joint Core Strategy

5.1. This section of the document introduces the strategic policy areas that the Joint Core Strategy will need to address. For each area there is a brief description of the policy context at a national and regional level and an explanation of how this translates locally. This is followed by an outline of what needs to be considered within that policy area and a set of potential outcomes. Each section concludes by asking for your views on how the policy area could be tackled.

5.2. The Joint Core Strategy will eventually sit in the middle of a hierarchy of plans that will set out the parameters for development in the area covered by the three Councils. It will provide the strategic level policy for the area (taking account of the Regional Spatial Strategy when it is published) and will form the main part of each Council's Local Development Framework. All subsequent Local Development Framework documents will need to be in conformity with the Joint Core Strategy.

5.3. In addition to the Regional Spatial Strategy there are a number of other influences that play their part in the preparation of the final Joint Core Strategy. These may be summarised as:-

  • National Planning Policies set out in government circulars regulations and policy statements
  • The Evidence Base, comprising data and spatial analysis of the situation at present in the Joint Core Strategy area
  • Local priorities determined by consultation with stakeholders and the wider general public
  • Sustainable Community Strategies prepared by the Local Strategic Partnerships

5.4. The three local authorities' Sustainable Community Strategies set out the vision each authority has for the development of their local area. The Joint Core Strategy must be mindful of these visions in the course of its preparation.

JCS Flow Chart

Regional Spatial Strategy

5.5. The Regional Spatial Strategy remains of importance to the production of the Core Strategy and will set out the level of housing and employment provision needed for each area of the South West up to the year 2026.

5.6. The Draft Regional Spatial Strategy was published in April 2006 and the Examination in Public of the document commenced a year later in April 2007. In July 2008, the Secretary of State published the Proposed Changes following receipt of the Panel's Report. The document represents the most up to date thinking about the Regional Strategy but the final version of the Regional Spatial Strategy remains as yet unpublished. The provision set out in the Proposed Modifications form the basis of this participation document, but this should neither imply acceptance or agreement with these provisions by the constituent authorities in the Joint Core Strategy area.

5.7. Acknowledging the contentious nature of the emerging Regional Spatial Strategy growth proposals, the housing figures contained within it comprise:

  • 34,200 additional dwellings to be provided for in the Joint Core Strategy area upto 2026. 11,500 of these to be in Gloucester, 8,100 in Cheltenham and 14,600 in Tewkesbury Borough 
  • 5 possible Urban Extensions in the area to provide up to 11,300 of the total housing set out above
  • 11,700 new jobs in the Gloucester Travel to Work Area and additional 79 hectares of employment land 10,700 new jobs to be provided for the Cheltenham Travel to Work Area and 39 hectares of additional employment land to be provided.

5.8. The Regional Spatial Strategy Proposed Changes also includes a possible urban extension to the south of Gloucester City, mostly withing the district of Stroud. This is not part of the Joint Core Strategy but will be addressed jointly with Stroud District Council should it be retained within the eventual published of the Regional Spatial Strategy.

Flexibility

5.9. Whatever the final provisions are of the Regional Spatial Strategy they remain a snapshot of what is thought likely to be required over nearly 20 years. Both the Regional Spatial Strategy and Joint Core Strategy when adopted will be constantly reviewed and monitored and changes made as circumstances change.

Gloucester City Urban Area

National Policy Context

5.10. The following national planning policy documents need to be considered in developing this policy area:-

  • Planning Policy Statement 1: Planning Sustainable Development
  • Supplement to Planning Policy Statement 1: Planning and Climate Change
  • Planning Policy Statement 3: Housing
  • Planning Policy Statement 6: Planning for Town Centres
  • Draft Planning Policy Statement 4: Planning for Sustainable Economic Development
Regional Planning Context
  • CSS: The Core Spatial Strategy
  • Development Policy A: Development at Strategically Significant Cities and Towns
  • HMA3: Gloucester and Cheltenham HMA
  • ES1: Sustainable Economic Prosperity
  • ES2: Providing for Employment land and Premises
  • ES3: Review of Employment Sites
What are the implications of the Regional Spatial Strategy for the South West - Secretary of State's Proposed Changes?

5.11. Gloucester is identified in Draft Development Policy A of the Regional Spatial Strategy as a Strategically Significant City or Town.  Towns and Cities have been identified as strategically significant due to the crucial role they play in the region as focal points for housing, employment, shops, services, facilities and public transport provision.  The Regional Spatial Strategy identifies locations for development in and around Gloucester recognising that the urban area of Gloucester cannot itself accommodate entirely the needs and demands for homes and jobs within the City.

5.12. While the Regional Spatial Strategy identifies a number of areas to accommodate the future expansion of the City, it also sets out a separate requirement of 11,500 new homes to be provided within the existing urban area by 2026. However, as this requirement began in 2006, an amount of this housing will either have already been built over the past three years or will already have been granted planning permission.

5.13. It is acknowledged that Gloucester has been underperforming economically in relation to the rest of the South West for a number of years and that economic performance needs to be improved if it is to compete with other cities and towns in the region and beyond. To tackle this the Regional Spatial Strategy proposes that 11,700 new jobs be provided across the Gloucester City Travel to Work Area. The Joint Core Strategy will need to develop a strategy that allows the City to grow economically and reach its potential.

Local issues affecting this policy area

5.14. The following Key Issues (see Spatial Portrait and Issues) and Strategic Objectives (see Vision and Objectives) are particularly relevant to this policy area.

Key Issues: 4 / 5 / 6 / 9 / 12 / 13 / 14
 
Strategic Objectives: 3 / 5 / 7 / 11
 
Commentary

5.15. As set out above, the Regional Spatial Strategy states that 11,500 new homes should be provided within Gloucester City's existing urban area by 2026.  Whilst the Joint Core Strategy will not allocate specific sites for all of the development required, it will need to outline a strategy for how this development will be delivered.

5.16. Primarily the Joint Core Strategy will need to consider where this new development could be accommodated. One key factor in the delivery of some of the City's requirement for homes and jobs is the Gloucester Heritage Urban Regeneration Company, which was established in 2004.  Its 'area of influence' is known as the 'Central Area' and includes a significant amount of brownfield (previously developed) land within the City. Your views on how the Joint Core Strategy should assist urban regeneration are sought in the Urban Regeneration Section of this document.

5.17. Early evidence informing the Joint Core Stratey indicates that the City is likely to be able to accommodate its housing requirement within its administrative boundary.  However, consideration needs to be given to the challenge of achieving this and what this would mean for the City. Consideration needs to be given to the significance of not meeting the requirement. Many of the sites located within the Gloucester Heritage Urban Regeneration Company's 'area of influence' are complex sites to develop. They have a variety of constraints, such as contaminated land, or poor accessibility, that make them difficult to bring forward for development.  Failing to deliver these sites could have an adverse impact on the City being able to achieve its housing requirement.

5.18. The approach to the areas proposed for development outside of the Gloucester's existing urban area are discussed in the Sustainable Urban Extensions section of this document.This consultation is seeking your views on the how the current requirement for development within existing urban area could be achieved in the City.

Things to consider
Outcomes
The Joint Core Strategy could maximise the amount of housing provided on urban sites by requiring increased densities.
High density development may provide the opportunity to increase the number of homes provided within the urban area. However, it may not provide the right type and range of housing required to meet peoples needs. This may affect the deliverability of a number of city centre urban sites.
Where the City cannot provide enough deliverable sites to meet its housing requirement it should seek to provide them as close to the City as possible.
This could result in an element of the City's housing requirement being provided within the urban extensions proposed on the edge of the City.
The Joint Core Strategy could identify areas or sites within the City where higher densities may be appropriate.
Development could primarily be concentrated in the city centre, with some additional appropriate peripheral sites identified.

How do you think the City can best accommodate future development?

Sustainability Impact

5.19. You may want to consider the following Sustainability Objectives (See http://www.gct-jcs.org/SustainabilityAppraisal/Home.aspx) when responding to questions on this policy area: 2, 7, 8, 10, 11, 14 and 15

Cheltenham Urban Area

National Policy Context

5.20. The following national planning policy documents need to be considered in developing this policy area:-

  • Planning Policy Statement 1: Planning Sustainable Development
  • Supplement to Planning Policy Statement 1: Planning and Climate Change
  • Planning Policy Statement 3: Housing
  • Planning Policy Statement 6: Planning for Town Centres
  • Draft Planning Policy Statement 4: Planning for Sustainable Economic Development
Regional Planning Context
  • CSS: The Core Spatial Strategy
  • Development Policy A: Development at Strategically Significant Cities and Towns
  • HMA3: Gloucester and Cheltenham HMA
  • ES1: Sustainable Economic Prosperity
  • ES2: Providing for Employment land and Premises
  • ES3: Review of Employment Sites
What are the implications of the Regional Spatial Strategy for the South West - Secretary of State's Proposed Changes?

5.21. Cheltenham is identified in Draft Development Policy A of the Regional Spatial Strategy as a Strategically Significant City or Town.  Towns and Cities have been identified as strategically significant due to the crucial role they play in the region as focal points for housing, employment, shops, services, facilities and public transport provision.  The Regional Spatial Strategy identifies locations for development in and around Cheltenham recognising that the urban area cannot itself entirely accommodate the needs and demands for homes and jobs.

5.22. The Regional Spatial Strategy identifies a number of areas around Cheltenham, mainly in Tewkesbury Borough, that it proposes should accommodate future growth in urban extensions. In addition, it identifies a separate requirement of 6,500 new homes to be provided within the existing urban area of Cheltenham by 2026. However, as this requirement began in 2006, an amount of this housing will either already have been built over the past three years or will already have been granted planning permission.

5.23. In addition to housing requirements, it is acknowledged that Cheltenham needs to compete economically with other cities and towns in the region and beyond. Regional Spatial Strategy proposes that 10,750 jobs be provided across the Cheltenham Travel to Work Area. The Joint Core Strategy will need to develop a strategy that allows Cheltenham to grow economically in a sustainable way.

5.24. The approach to the areas proposed for development outside Cheltenham's existing urban area are discussed in the Sustainable Urban Extensions section of this document. This section seeks your views on how Cheltenham can accommodate development within the existing urban area.

Local issues affecting this policy area

5.25. The following Key Issues (see Spatial Portrait and Issues) and Strategic Objectives (see Vision and Objectives) are particularly relevant to this policy area.

Key Issues: 4 / 5 / 6 / 9 / 12 / 13 / 14

Strategic Objectives: 3 / 5 / 7 / 11

Commentary

5.26. As set out previously, the Regional Spatial Strategy states that 6,500 new homes should be provided within Cheltenham's existing urban area by 2026.  Whilst the Joint Core Strategy will not allocate specific sites for all of the development required, it will need to outline a strategy for how this development will be delivered. 

5.27. Historically Cheltenham has been seen as an attractive place to live and work with a good quality of life and areas of high architectural worth. Cheltenham town centre is renowned for its high quality retail options and has historically performed significantly better than its population should suggest. It is recognised that Cheltenham needs to continue to move forward to maintain its position as an important retail centre and retain the town's economic prosperity. Housing and employment provision still remain a priorty for the town and there is a particular need to provide higher levels of affordable housing.

5.28. The "Civic Pride" programme was launched with the aim of regenerating and improving the viability of a number of key town centre sites and improving the vitality and attractiveness of the town centre as a whole. Civic Pride is also likely to assist in providing some of the new homes and employment proposed for the town.Your views on the how the Joint Core Strategy should assist urban regeneration are sought in the Urban Regeneration Section of this document.

5.29. In this section we are seeking your views on how the current requirement for development could be achieved in the town.

Things to consider

Outcome

The Joint Core Strategy could maximise the amount of housing provided on urban sites by requiring increased densities.

 

High density development may provide the opportunity to increase the number of homes provided within the urban area. However, it may not provide the right type and range of housing required to meet peoples needs. This may affect the deliverability of a number of town centre urban sites. High density development may not be appropriate in some areas of the Borough. 

It may not be possible to identify sufficient sites within the urban area to meet the housing requirements. Should the Joint Core Strategy seek to provide them as close to the urban area as possible.

This could result in an element of Cheltenham's housing requirement needing to be found on the periphery of the urban areas, in the countryside or within urban extensions.

The Joint Core Strategy could identify areas or specific sites within Cheltenham where more intensive development or higher densities may be appropriate.

Development could primarily be concentrated in the town centre, with some additional appropriate peripheral sites identified.

The Joint Core Strategy could identify sites within the Cheltenham Green Belt.

Within Cheltenham Borough there are areas designated as Green Belt. Should development be permitted in these areas to reduce pressure on the urban area?

How do you think Cheltenham can best accommodate future development?

Sustainability Impact

5.30. You may want to consider the following Sustainability Objectives (See http://www.gct-jcs.org/SustainabilityAppraisal/Home.aspx) when responding to questions on this policy area: 2, 7, 8, 10, 11, 14 and 15

Tewkesbury Borough

National Policy Context

5.31. The following national planning policy documents need to be considered in developing this policy area:- 

  • Planning Policy Statement 1: Planning Sustainable Development
  • Supplement to Planning Policy Statement 1: Planning and Climate Change
  • Planning Policy Statement 3: Housing
  • Draft Planning Policy Statement 4: Planning for Sustainable Economic Development
  • Planning Policy Statement 6: Planning for Town Centres
  • Planning Policy Statement 7: Sustainable Development in Rural Areas
  • Planning Policy Statement 25: Development and Flood Risk
Regional Planning Context
  • CSS: The Core Spatial Strategy
  • Development Policy A: Development at Strategically Significant Cities and Towns
  • Development Policy B: Development at Market Towns
  • Development Policy C: Development at Small Towns and Villages
  • HMA3: Gloucester and Cheltenham HMA
  • ES1: Sustainable Economic Prosperity
  • ES2: Providing for Employment land and Premises
  • ES3: Review of Employment Sites
What are the implications of the Regional Spatial Strategy for the South West - Secretary of State's Proposed Changes?

5.32. The Regional Spatial Strategy  proposes that 14,600 new homes and a significant number of new jobs should be provided in Tewkesbury Borough by 2026. To accommodate the majority of this growth it proposes five urban extensions to Cheltenham and Gloucester primarily within Tewkesbury Borough.

5.33. In addition to the urban extensions, it is proposed that 2,900 new homes should be provided across Tewkesbury Borough outside the urban extensions. However, as this requirement began in 2006, an amount of this housing will either already have been built over the past three years or will already have been granted planning permission.

Local issues affecting this policy area

5.34.  The following Key Issues (see Spatial Portrait and Issues) and Strategic Objectives (see Vision and Objectives) are particularly relevant to this policy area.

Key Issues: 1 / 2 / 5 / 9 / 11 / 12 / 14

Strategic Objectives: 3 / 5 / 7 / 11

Commentary

5.35. The Regional Spatial Strategy sets out that 2,900 new homes should be provided across Tewkesbury Borough outside proposed urban extensions by 2026. Tewkesbury  Borough will also have to supply significant levels of employment land to support the economy of the Joint Core Strategy area. Whilst the Joint Core Strategy will not in itself allocate specific sites for all development, it is critical that it includes a strategy that can deliver this development.

5.36. Within the Borough, Tewkesbury is an important market town that together with the adjacent built up area of Northway is identified as the Borough's principle settlement and has a good range of services including community facilities and shops. One option to accommodate future development would be to identify Tewkesbury/Northway as an area for growth. Another option could be to identify Tewkesbury/Northway and Winchcome (a market town with a high level of community facilities) as areas for growth.

5.37. The approach to the areas proposed for urban extensions is discussed in the Sustainable Urban Extensions section of this document. This section seeks your views on how Tewkesbury Borough can accommodate development outside the urban extensions.

Things to consider

Outcome

The Joint Core Strategy could identify Tewkesbury/Northway as the area for growth.

All growth would be concentrated adjacent to the built up area of Tewkesbury/Northway. Smaller settlements may not have the opportunity for limited growth to help maintain services.

The Joint Core Strategy could identify Tewkesbury/Northway and Winchcombe as areas for growth.

All growth would be concentrated adjacent to the built up areas of Tewkesbury/Northway and Winchcombe. Smaller settlements may not have the opportunity for limited growth to help maintain services.

Figure 3: Joint Core Strategy Area

 

JCS Strategy Area

Looking at the table and alternatives above, do you have any views on where development should be focussed? 
 
Do you think there are any alternatives that have not been considered?  If so, what are they?
 
Sustainability Impact

5.38. You may want to consider the following Sustainability Objectives (See http://www.gct-jcs.org/SustainabilityAppraisal/Home.aspx) when responding to questions on this policy area: 2, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11 and 15

Sustainable Urban Extensions

National Policy Context

5.39. The following national planning policy documents need to be considered in developing this policy area:- 

  • Planning Policy Statement 1: Planning Sustainable Development
  • Supplement to Planning Policy Statement 1: Planning and Climate Change
  • Planning Policy Guidance Note 2: Green Belts
  • Planning Policy Statement 3: Housing
  • Draft Planning Policy Statement 4: Planning for Sustainable Economic Development
  • Planning Policy Statement 6: Planning for Town Centres
  • Planning Policy Statement 7: Sustainable Development in Rural Areas
Regional Planning Context
  • CSS: The Core Spatial Strategy
  • Development Policy A: Development at Strategically Significant Cities and Towns
  • HMA3: Gloucester and Cheltenham HMA
  • ES1: Sustainable Economic Prosperity
  • ES2: Providing for Employment land and Premises
  • ES3: Review of Employment Sites
What are the implications of the Regional Spatial Strategy for the South West - Secretary of State's Proposed Changes?

5.40. The Regional Spatial Strategy proposes that the Gloucestershire Green Belt should continue to maintain the separate identities of Cheltenham and Gloucester. However, the Spatial Strategy considers that the requirement for new homes in both settlements and the need to provide additional jobs means that this need cannot be met solely within the existing urban areas.

5.41. The Regional Spatial Strategy considers that the most sustainable solution is to develop extensions to existing urban areas (Sustainable Urban Extensions). As a result, it identifies five "areas of search" for urban extensions within the Joint Core Strategy area. The five areas are represented diagrammatically but they can be broadly defined as:-

  1. North of Gloucester (around Longford/Innsworth)
  2. North West of Cheltenham (around Swindon Village/Uckington)
  3. South of Cheltenham (around Shurdington/Leckhampton - including land formerly known as "white land")
  4. North of Bishops Cleeve
  5. Land North of Brockworth (east of Gloucester)

5.42. The original draft of the Regional Spatial Strategy proposed only two areas of search, namely those at North West of Cheltenham and North of Gloucester. The remaining three areas of search were added after the Examination in Public by the Secretary of State in her Proposed Changes.

5.43. If the Regional Spatial Strategy is published it will ultimately be for the Joint Core Strategy to more precisely define the boundaries of these urban extensions and to set out policies for the design and development of these areas; including infrastructure provision and phasing. The precise number of urban extensions required and the level of development they will be expected to accommodate will be dependant upon the final publication of the Regional Spatial Strategy. However, the three Council's reiterate their objection to the contents of the most recent version of the Regional Spatial Strategy.

Local issues affecting this policy area

5.44. The following Key Issues (see Spatial Portrait and Issues) and Strategic Objectives (see Vision and Objectives) are particularly relevant to this policy area.

Key Issues: 1 / 2 / 4 / 5 / 6 / 9 / 11 / 13 / 14

Strategic Objectives: 3 / 4 / 5 / 7 / 8 / 9 / 13

Commentary

5.45. It is possible at this stage; based on the most recent version of the Regional Spatial Strategy to asses the potential development capacity of each of the urban extensions and to give a general indication of what associated facilities they could accommodate. Three of the proposed "areas of search" are partially located within existing Green Belt (North West of Cheltenham, North of Gloucester and South of Cheltenham) and there is an expectation in the Draft Regional Spatial Strategy that Green Belt boundaries would have to be redrawn to accommodate the development proposed in these areas.

5.46. All the proposed urban extensions potentially have detailed development issues that would need to be satisfactorily addressed before they could be developed; these include matters such as transport and accessibility, landscaping, detailed design guidance, flood risk assessment, habitat protection and many other considerations that accompany any new development. At this stage, however, the focus of this consultation is to get views on the fundamental principles associated with the possible development of urban extensions if the Regional Spatial Strategy is published in accordance with the Secretary of State's Proposed Changes.

5.47. Below is a brief summary of each of the five urban extensions proposed by the Regional Spatial Strategy for the South West - Secretary of State's Proposed Changes:-

1. North of Gloucester
  • Development of this area would require an alteration to the Green Belt boundary.
  • This area of search was included in both the Draft Regional Spatial Strategy for the South West and in the Secretary of State's Proposed Changes. It is expected to accommodate up to 2,500 new homes.
  • If 2,500 new homes are built in this area, it may also need to accommodate approximately 10 hectares of land for open space, 3 hectares of land for educational uses, 5.5 hectares of employment land and nearly 3.5 hectares of land for community facilities. Around 3.5 hectares would be required for additional infrastructure needs.
2. North West of Cheltenham
  • Development of this area would require an alteration to the Green Belt boundary.
  • This area of search was included in both the Draft Regional Spatial Strategy for the South West and in the Secretary of State's Proposed Changes. Initially it was expected to accommodate 4,000 new homes but the Secretary of State proposed that this should increase to 5,000.
  • If 5,000 new homes are built in this area, it may also need to accommodate approximately 11 hectares of employment land, 20 hectares of open space, in excess of 14 hectares for educational uses and over 6.5 hectares for community facilities. Around 7.5 hectares would be required for additional infrastructure needs.
3. South of Cheltenham
  • Development of this area may require an alteration to the Green Belt boundary.
  • This area of search was not included in the Draft Regional Spatial Strategy for the South West but was introduced by the Secretary of State's Proposed Changes with a capacity of around 1,300 new homes.
  • If 1,300 new homes are built in this area, it may also need to accommodate over 5 hectares of open space, 1.6 hectares for educational uses, nearly 3 hectares of employment land and 1.75 hectares for community facilties. Around 1.9 hectares would be required for additional infrastructure needs.
 4. North of Bishops Cleeve
  • This area of search was not included in the Draft Regional Spatial Strategy for the South West but was introduced by the Secretary of State's Proposed Changes with a capacity of around 1,000 new homes.
  • If 1,000 new homes are built in this area, it may also need to accommodate over 1 hectare for educational uses, 2.2 hectares of employment land and 1.35 hectares for community facilities. Around 1.5 hectares would be required for additional infrastructure needs.

 

 

 5. Land North of Brockworth
  • Development of this area may require an alteration to the Green Belt boundary.
  • This area of search was not included in the Draft Regional Spatial Strategy for the South West but was introduced by the Secretary of State's Proposed Changes with a capacity of up to 1,500 new homes.
  • If 1,500 new homes are built in this area, it may also need to accommodate almost 6 hectares of open space, 2 hectares for educational uses, 3.3 hectares of employment land and over 2 hectares for community facilities. Around 2 hectares would be required for additional infrastructure needs.
Urban Extensions and Sustainability

5.48. The potential urban extensions outlined above are seen, by the latest version of the Regional Spatial Strategy, as being the most sustainable option to accommodate additional housing growth outside of the existing urban areas. The paragraphs above give approximate theoretical calculations of the land required in each of the areas of search to accommodate some of the more basic components of sustainable living. This does not mean that all of these components will necessarily be provided in all of the urban extensions. Some of these areas, because of their relative size and relationship to existing urban areas, may be more sustainable if the majority of these facilities are provided within the urban extension. Other areas may be located close to existing community facilities or centres of employment and in those instances the most sustainable solution may be to utilise existing facilities rather than trying to provide them all within the urban extension.  All urban extensions would need to provide a substantial element of affordable housing.

5.49. If the Regional Spatial Strategy is finalised and published, the Joint Core Strategy will need to ensure that all urban extensions are delivered in the most sustainable way possible. This consultation seeks your views on how this could be achieved and what facilities you feel should be provided at urban extensions to ensure that they are sustainable.

Things to consider

Outcomes

Should Sustainable Urban Extensions be self sufficient and seek to meet all of their own needs such as shops community facilities and schools?

Such facilities may not always be provided at the beginning of development and may only be provided as development progresses. In some instances the amount of development proposed may be too small to justify provision or provide a sufficient range of facilities and  adjoining urban areas might provide such facilities more effectively.

Should employment opportunities be provided in Sustainable Urban Extensions in proportion to their potential population?

One principle of sustainable living is to try to reduce the number and length of journeys to work. It may be desirable to provide employment opportunities at urban extensions so that residents have the choice to live close to their work. However, smaller urban extensions may not be able to provide a sufficient range of employment opportunities for this to be realistic.


What role do you think Sustainable Urban Extensions should play within the wider Joint Core Strategy area?

Sustainability Impact

5.50. You may want to consider the following Sustainability Objectives (See http://www.gct-jcs.org/SustainabilityAppraisal/Home.aspx) when responding to questions on this policy area: 2, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 14, 15 and 17

Priorities for Delivery Through Development

National Policy Context

5.51. The following national planning policy document needs to be considered in developing this policy area:- 

  • Planning Policy Statement 1: Planning Sustainable Development
What are the implications of National Policy?

5.52. National Planning Policy Statement 1: Delivering Sustainable Development sets out the Government's commitment to developing strong, vibrant and sustainable communities. It requires development plans to carefully consider the relationship between social inclusion, protecting and enhancing the environment, the prudent use of natural resources and economic development when formulating planning policy.  It advises that this should be done by bringing together and integrating policies for the development of land with other plan, policies and programmes that influence the nature of places and how they can function.

Regional Planning Context
  • CSS: The Core Spatial Strategy
  • Development Policy A: Development at Strategically Significant Cities and Towns
  • Development Policy B: Development at Market Towns
  • Development Policy C: Developemnt in Small Towns and Villages
  • Development Policy D: Infrastructure for Developments
What are the implications of the Regional Spatial Strategy for the South West - Secretary of State's Proposed Changes?

5.53. The Regional Spatial Strategy sets out the Government's proposals for the Joint Core Strategy area to the year 2026. While the three Councils object to a number of policies within the Regional Spatial Strategy in particular some of the areas of search for urban extensions, it is important in planning the future of the area that the Joint Core Strategy sets out what the priorities are for sustainable mixed communities in the Joint Core Strategy area.

Local issues affecting this policy area

5.54. The following Key Issues (see Spatial Portrait and Issues) and Strategic Objectives (see Vision and Objectives) are particularly relevant to this policy area.

Key Issues: 4 / 3 / 12 / 13 / 14 

Strategic Objectives: 1 / 2 / 3 / 4 / 8 / 9 / 10

 

Commentary

5.55. The Joint Core Strategy area contains a wide variety of mixed communities that are supported by a range of community infrastructure such as healthcare, open space, parks and gardens, transport and education. Many of these are provided alongside development through developer contributions, in association with other public funding, to ensure that communities have access to a range of community needs. In planning the future of the Joint Core Strategy area, a strategy needs to be developed that ensures that this infrastructure is maintained and improved upon. The strategy should also consider how it can deliver a wider sustainable environment for people to live in.

5.56. To achieve this, the Joint Core Strategy will need to establish what the priorities are for the provision of community infrastructure. These priorities will be informed by the current Sustainable Community Strategies but it is also important to seek your views on what you feel should be prioritised.

5.57. Listed below is a selection of infrastructure that could be secured through development:

  • Affordable housing
  • Education
  • Community facilities, eg. village halls, post offices, libraries etc
  • Formal sport and recreation
  • Informal sport and recreation, including open space
  • Flood prevention measures
  • Walking and cycling improvements
  • Public transport improvements
  • New roads and highways
  • Rail improvements
  • Public realm improvements
  • Climate change measures
  • Renewable energy initiatives
  • Other (please specify)
Please choose which six of the above that you would make the priority to be secured through development proposals.

Sustainability Impact

5.58. You may want to consider the following Sustainability Objectives (See http://www.gct-jcs.org/SustainabilityAppraisal/Home.aspx) when responding to questions on this policy area: 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 8, 12, 14, 16, 17 and 18.

Urban Regeneration

National Policy Context

5.59. The following national planning policy documents need to be considered in developing this policy area:-

  • Planning Policy Statement 1: Planning Sustainable Development
  • Planning Policy Statement 3: Housing
  • Planning Policy Statement 6: Planning for Town Centres
  • Draft Planning Policy Statement 4: Planning for Sustainable Economic Development
Regional Planning Context
  • CSS: The Core Spatial Strategy
  • Development Policy A: Development at Strategically Significant Cities and Towns
  • HMA3: Gloucester and Cheltenham HMA
Local Context
  • Gloucester Heritage Urban Regeneration Company (GHURC)
  • Cheltenham Civic Pride
Local issues affecting this policy area

5.60. The following Key Issues (see Spatial Portrait and Issues) and Strategic Objectives (see Vision and Objectives) are particularly relevant to this policy area.

Key Issues: 4 / 5 / 12

Strategic Objectives: 5 / 8 / 10

Commentary

5.61. The Regional Spatial Strategy requires the existing urban areas to provide significant levels of housing and employment. While the three Councils currently object to a number of policies within the most recent version of the Regional Spatial Strategy there are a number of important urban regeneration initiatives that are already being promoted within Gloucester and Cheltenham, namely the Gloucester Heritage Urban Regeneration Company and Cheltenham Civic Pride.

5.62. It is important that in bringing forward urban regeneration schemes (which are primary on brownfield sites and urban extensions normally on the edge of settlements) that this is done so in a complimentary rather than conflicting manner. Given the proposals set out in the Regional Spatial Strategy, the level of house building that will need to come forward on an annual basis is likely to be higher than that which can be achieved from the urban areas alone. In the same vein it is not appropriate to release large areas of greenfield land on the edge of urban areas at the expense of the wider regeneration of the urban areas.

5.63. The urban areas of Gloucester and Cheltenham are vital to the Gloucestershire economy and must be revitalised if they are to continue to be attractive places for people to visit, work and live. The Joint Core Strategy will need to consider the manner in which urban sites and greenfield urban extensions can be brought forward in an integrated manner so that housing requirements can be achieved without compromising urban regeneration.

5.64. In order to bring forward and promote urban regeneration the Joint Core Strategy could identify and define key regeneration areas and identify a suite of policies for each that will help shape the way sites are developed. Such areas could include the regeneration areas of the Gloucestershire Heritage Urban Regeneration Company and the sites covered by Cheltenham Civic Pride.

5.65. The following illustrations shows the extent of the Gloucester Heritage Urban Regeneration Company regeneration area and the key sites within it and the sites included within Cheltenham Civic Pride.

Figure 4: Gloucester Urban Area

Gloucester Urban Area


 

 

 

Figure 5: Cheltenham Urban Area

Cheltenham Urban Area

 

5.66. The Joint Core Strategy will need to develop a policy framework that allows these sites to come forward in parallel to peripheral greenfield sites. This consultation seeks your views on how this could be achieved.

Things to consider

Outcome


The Joint Core Strategy could identify key areas of Gloucester City and Cheltenham as regeneration areas and include a suite of policies specific to them to bring forward development schemes.


The area delineating the remit of the Gloucester Heritage Urban Regeneration Company and an area outlining the extent of Cheltenham's Civic Pride could be set out in a Joint Core Strategy Policy.

The policy could also identify a number of key sites that will be brought forward as part of the regeneration area, along with specific design and infrastructure requirements included.

While the regeneration areas would have specific policies for them guiding development proposals, they would not be strategic allocations. This would allow a greater range of flexibility in bringing the whole area forward.  This could result in less certainty about how sites could be developed

The Joint Core Strategy could include specific strategic allocations for sites within the urban areas and bring forward development on a site-by-site basis.

This would set out a series of development policies specific to key regeneration sites within the Joint Core Strategy area. This could require a greater degree of certainty in terms of delivery. It could identify fewer areas for development as it would only identify those sites that are fundamental to the delivery of the Joint Core Strategy.  This would provide a degree of certainty to development but give less flexibility.

The Joint Core Strategy could adopt an approach where it seeks to introduce regeneration initiatives within Tewkesbury itself or the rural areas. While there is no active vehicle for regeneration within the rural areas or Tewkesbury this could build upon the Healthy Towns Initiative and / or foster greater opportunities for the regeneration of rural areas.

What approach do you think should be used to bring forward urban regeneration sites?


Managing The Release of Land

5.67. The Joint Core Strategy will need to consider how it manages the release of land across the area. In order to manage bringing forward urban sites in a complementary way with sites on the edge of the urban areas, a phasing policy could be included. This could be used to ensure that sites within the urban area are either brought forward in advance of sites on the edge of the urban areas or at the same time as them.

Things to consider

Outcomes

The Joint Core Strategy could include a phasing policy that ensures that sites within the urban area are brought forward in advance of those on the edge of the urban areas.

This approach would focus on urban brownfield land before greenfield land.  This may be a difficult policy to implement on the basis that urban sites can be more difficult to develop than greenfield sites on the edge of the urban area. It may also restrict sites that are in are sustainable locations in preference for sites within the urban areas.

The Joint Core Strategy could include a phasing policy that allows both urban and greenfield sites on the edge of the urban area to come forward together at the same time

This would need to be implemented in a co-ordinated manner that is focused on bringing forward sites based on their ability to create and contribute to sustainable communities. Sites would be included within the Joint Core Strategy housing trajectories on the basis of this and brought forward in a manner that seeks to ensure that urban areas are revitalised and regenerated as planned.

The Joint Core Strategy could be prepared without a phasing policy and allow the market to dictate when sites are developed.

This would not require the Joint Core Strategy to include a policy on phasing at all and allow the market to determine when a site shall be brought forward. It may not provide the clarity or certainty required from the development plan process, and may not ensure brownfield regeneration sites are delivered.


How do you think that the Joint Core Strategy should manage the phasing of urban regeneration and greenfield development?

Sustainability Impact

5.68. You may want to consider the following Sustainability Objectives (See http://www.gct-jcs.org/SustainabilityAppraisal/Home.aspx) when responding to questions on this policy area: 6, 7, 8, 11 and 18



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